Everyday Carry: Retro Wolverine

Debuting in a 1974 issue of The Incredible Hulk, Wolverine eventually went on to become one of the most popular comic book characters of all time as a member of the X-Men franchise. However, it wasn’t this way in the beginning. In the early days, the clawed antihero was overshadowed by his fellow mutants and was almost nixed from the series entirely before writer John Byrne saw potential in the character.

Starting in 1977, he was revamped with a new look and an extensive backstory. Becoming a household name in the ‘90s thanks to the unfathomable popularity of the X-Men at the time, Wolverine has since achieved legendary status in the comic world. The following EDC loadout is inspired by the character’s yellow and blue ensemble.

Field Notes Quarterly Signs of Spring

Field Notes isn’t just a dominant force in the stationary community for its high-quality, American-made EDC notebooks but for the thought and detail put into its memorable designs. The Illinois-based firm constructs each of its releases using a five-pocket saddle stitcher and soy-based inks sourced from the nearby city of Waukegan. A few times a year, the brand blesses us with its quarterly releases. Last year, its Signs of Spring notebooks featured three different covers, each debossed with the pattern of a different North American flower that is among the first to bloom each spring.

SOG Aegis FX Fixed Blade Knife

Master of crafting tactical yet modern tools ever since launching in 1986, SOG makes some of the best fixed-blade EDC knives on the market, and at fair prices. Case in point, this sub-$100 Aegix FX represents the Southern California-based brand’s military focus, sporting a stone-washed Krupp 4116 stainless steel blade with glass-reinforced nylon scales in blue and yellow. For safe stowing, it also comes with a blue sheath.

Oakley Leffingwell

Inspired by surfboard design and the surf culture popular in its Orange County, CA milieu, the full-rim Leffingwell shades are one of Oakley’s most understated models. The frames themselves are constructed from BiO Matter, a plant-based material that’s durable yet lightweight, and the hinges and detailing are antique-finished for a lofted aesthetic. Likewise, the sunglasses utilize the brand’s Prizm lenses for increased contrast in brighter conditions.

Shinola The Sea Creatures

Debuting in 2011, Michigan-based Shinola got its start after taking on the name of a defunct shoe polish company and infusing its new brand with a real spirit of Americana. Like most of its designs, The Sea Creatures evokes nostalgia but has modern accessibility. Made from ocean-bound plastics, the 40mm case houses an in-house assembled automatic movement and boasts 100m of dive capability.