Seiko Celebrates 110 Years of Watchmaking with a New Version of Its First-Ever Wristwatch

Photo: Seiko

As part of its 150th anniversary, Seiko is acknowledging its roots with a rehashed iteration of its first-ever timepiece. The heritage Japanese horologist’s Presage branch has recreated the iconic Laurel wristwatch to a tee, showcasing all the traditional elements that made it special.

Photo: Seiko

Upon its release in 1913, the Laurel served as Seiko’s very first wristwatch, leaving no room to question why it (and the rest of the watch world) holds the silhouette in such high reverence. And since it was initially designed and crafted by Kintaro Hattori, the man who founded Seiko in 1881, the latest example to earn the Presage label retains every bit of integral craftsmanship instilled by the watchmaker behind it all. This includes a shining 37.5mm stainless steel case with a large onion crown, a white-colored enamel dial with thin blue hands, and a trusty power reserve indicator.

Photo: Seiko

Behind the dial, it is powered by Seiko’s signature 6R27 movement that offers a lengthy 45-hour power reserve. Lastly, each case back is engraved to acknowledge the limited edition release, of which only 2,500 examples will be made. As a testament to the Laurel’s unabashed legacy, it’s worth noting that the watch was even heralded as one of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers’ “Mechanical Engineering Heritages,” going to show just how much of an impact a particular timepiece can have on the technological world.

While Seiko hasn’t addressed pricing, the Presage Line’s SPB359 will be available in January.