Taschen’s ‘Logo Beginnings’ Book Sheds a Light on Forgotten Designs

Taschen’s literal library of design books is something to behold as a whole, and it’s added another noteworthy tome to its collection. Logo Beginnings takes a deep dive into the world of corporate branding and its ever-so-effective sense of symbolism, even for examples that aren’t around nowadays.

Consisting of over 6,000 logos from between the years 1870 and 1940, this comprehensive guide to company logo design is organized accordingly, in categories of “Figurative,” “Form,” “Effect,” and “Typographical.” Written by Jens Müller, a German author and graphic design historian, Logo Beginnings consists of a sprawling variety of unique, world-famous exercises in branding like NBC’s ubiquitous peacock or Shell gas station’s shell emblem.

Serving as far more than a visual compendium of corporate logos, this 432-page book provides incredible, fundamental insight highlighting the impact of these famed, trademarked designs. In the book’s preface, Müller dissects the deeper meaning of graphic design through a visual essay crafted by F.H. Ehmcke, a pioneer in the field. Through a wide array of forgotten illustrations and social-defining stamps, Logo Beginnings looks to adhere to the old age of advertising in as professional a manner as possible.

If you’re a fan of corporate design’s new stuff, then you’ve simply got to check out the originals. Make Logo Beginnings the highlight of your coffee table today for $80.

Purchase: $80

Photo: Taschen
Photo: Taschen
Photo: Taschen