Explore The American Southwest’s Alien Landscape In ‘Space To Roam’

The vastness of the universe is often predicated on our understanding of the world around us — the notion that we, as human beings, are a highly-adaptable (and gratuitously-gifted) species that plays a leading role in the preservation of the planet. But amidst our careful observation and tireless pursuit of knowledge, we’ve come to understand the complicated grandeur of our own habitable zone — a large, exuberant sphere that still remains alien in a menagerie of ways.

In cinematographer Andrew Studer’s new exploratory short film, Space To Roam, the beauteous formations of America’s southwestern expanse serve as the primary backdrop for the figurehead of human coexistence. A spaceman, foreign and unaware of his surroundings, traverses a sea of painted rocks, crater-borne lakebeds, and decaying monoliths — illustrating the tenacity of exploration and a lust for the unknown. While Studer’s subject seemingly roams the surface of some distant planet, the film takes place on none other than our very own mass of dirt, rock, and liquid — specifically, atop the public lands that have served to inspire the revelatory tribute.