RAMA M60-A Keyboard

Mar 26, 2018

Category: Tech

Mechanical keyboards, once ubiquitous in the 1980s and ‘90s, became harder to come by in the mid to late aughts as rubber dome membrane switches won consumers over with their sleek looks. Over the past couple of years, however, the old-school keyboard has been making a comeback. One of the brands leading the charge? RAMA with their M60-A.

This keyboard is made from a single piece of solid brass and aluminum, given a high polish, bead blasted, and an anodized finish. The result is an incredibly striking (and heavy – weighing in at 3.5-pounds) interface that provides much more satisfying tactile feedback while typing up emails, writing that novel you’ve been working on, or posting bad tweets. And because this keyboard comes without keys or switches, you can customize it exactly to your liking. These are available in black, grey, silver, pink, green, or navy.

Purchase: $360

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