Boeing 737 Cowling Chair

Apr 21, 2016

Category: Living

Ever wonder what it would be like to sit inside of a Bowing 737 engine cowling? Well, probably not, but thanks to England-based Fallen Furniture, you can experience it anyway. They’ve crafted a luxurious leather 737 Cowling chair from authentic parts of military and civilian aircraft.

In its original form the chair sits atop a highly polished aluminum base Stood. Not only does this support the chair, but also allows it to spin effortlessly on its axis. It’s the pinnacle of luxury seating, and hard not to feel like some sort ofBbond villain while posting up within the confines of the turbine cowling. Each finished shell is adorned in high gloss allowing the piece to really pop in any setting. And the plush interior upholstered in premium quality black leather complements the piece as a whole, which serves as a proper tribute to the aviation industry and its heritage. Each chair measures 6.5 feet in length, depth, and width, and can be made to order and customized according to personal preferences. [Purchase]

737 Cowling Chair 2

737 Cowling Chair 3

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