Fix-It Kits: The 8 Best Bike Multi-Tools

In your car, a flat tire or a mechanical problem can be a hassle. You have to call AAA and then play one of the multitude of Android games on your phone until roadside service rescues you. On your bicycle, there isn’t any roadside service, and a problem could strand you miles from help. To avoid walking like some poor sap who doesn’t have a $4,000 hybrid bike, you’re going to need to arm yourself with a bike multi-tool.

Multi-tools built specifically for bikes tend to divide the cycling populace. There are those who love them and those who wish the person who invented them had died tragically before they unleashed their multi-tool hell unto the world. Wherever you come down on the debate, the truth remains that they’re one of the most compact ways to keep your wheels turning. Even those that hate them would do well to have one on hand. They give you all the hex keys, screwdrivers, and even wrenches you need to do some quick repairs on the move. Many include a chain tool for replacing links. Whether you’re a wintertime fat bike die-hard or road bike marathoner, we’ve got the 8 best bike multi-tools for you.

Topeak Hexus II

Topeak Hexus II

Pro: Easy twisting mechanism on chain breaker
Con: Tends to corrode over time

All In: Topeak’s name is synonymous with quality bicycling accessories. The Hexus II is one of their most appealing products, striking the balance between value, size, function, and excess. Here you have your basic hex and screwdriver needs covered with the addition of a tire lever and a chain breaker, all folded up into one of the most intuitive packages we’ve ever handled. Rather than a mass of bits all crammed together, this is split up nicely for easier deployment, better handling, and a simpler grip style than your average hexy hunk of metal. The tire levers snap into the sides, making the entire package more consolidated. [Purchase: $20]

Pro Minitool 11

Pro Minitool 11

Pro: Side-etched ruler
Con: No chain breaker

Slim Pickin’s: Narrow and gaunt as a supermodel, the Minitool 11 is made to fit in your jersey pocket or the trimmest side pocket on your bicycling backpack. It hits most standard hex tip needs and has all the standby screwdrivers. Crossbars are included for a tighter fold when not in use, and offers a better grip during work. With no projections or snagging parts to stick out, it can easily be put alongside your spare tube without running the risk of accidental punctures and won’t prod you when put into a pocket. [Purchase: $18]

Reductivist Ringtool

Reductivist Ringtool

Pro: Fits on any key chain
Con: Very hard to grip well

Bare Minimum: Forget about a mini tool, you need the smallest multi-tool you can possibly get to keep grams low for your fast-paced pedaling existence. The Ringtool is ridiculously wee, not even as big as a carabiner, and can fit on your key chain for easy carrying at all times. Made with commuter bike riders in mind, it’s meant to be slender and professional, offering the ability to make quick adjustments, not overhaul your rig by the side of the road. For hexes, it has 3-8mm options, Phillips and flathead screwdrivers, a T25 torxhead, and a couple of spoke wrenches. Oh yeah, and opens bottles. [Purchase: $28]

Crank Brothers Multi Bicycle Tool

Crank Brothers Multi Bicycle Tool

Pro: Long lasting
Con: Chain tool tends to flop open

EDC: This is your bombproof, go anywhere, always in your pocket multi-tool. It’s tough, it’s affordable, and it does the job well. Among the 19 functions are 7 hexes, 4 spoke wrenches, a couple of Phillips and flathead screwdrivers, a T25 torx, and a massive chain tool that works on your heavier cyclocross chains. All are strapped in tight and ready for action. The frame is 6061-T6 aluminum with each tool made from 6150 high tensile steel, so breaks and corrosion are nigh impossible. [Purchase: $30]

Lezyne V-10 Mini

Lezyne V-10 Mini

Pro: Chain breaker twist is metal, not plastic
Con: Difficult to get leverage

Basic Premium: The first thing that companies drop when they go in to make a tiny multi-tool for bicycles is the chain breaker. Sure, that isn’t a huge loss, and most chain tools are cheap anyhow, but Lezyne felt that it was necessary enough to keep it in the mix on the V-10 Mini. The body is made entirely of CNC 7075 aluminum with the tools using chrome vanadium steel that is better than most metals at fighting off corrosion. 2-6mm hexes, both T25 and T30 Torx wrenches, and a Phillips screwdriver complete the package. [Purchase: $36]

Lezyne CRV 20

Lezyne CRV 20

Pro: Lightweight considering number of tools
Con: Blade can cause cuts when deploying other bits

Swiss Army Tool: Bike multi-tools use the same basic folding features as many knives, but they typically don’t have the extra accessories. Along with the 2-8mm hex bits, T25 torx head, tire lever, and triple spoke wrenches, the CRV 20 has a handy camping knife and bottle opener. Each of the tools is made with CNC-cut chrome vanadium steel that resists harsh weather or days stuck in sweaty saddlebags. The addition of a serrated blade allows for fewer accessories to be carried and lets you dig goat heads out of your tires. The action on every piece feels natural and smooth thanks to the stunning Lezyne craftsmanship. [Purchase: $39]

Victorinox Bike Tool

Victorinox Bike Tool

Pro: Durable, rounded container
Con: Tool options are limited

Head Change: Stepping away from the way most of the other tools on the list are made, this is a compact Allen wrench that works more like a lug by allowing various heads to be changed out via adapter so you aren’t fumbling with folding parts. Though small, you can get much better leverage using the L-wrench than you would with the humdrum folding style tools. Included are two tire levers that help snap down all the parts so nothing can go astray. At just 3.5oz this is one of our favorites since the ability to grip it with any sized hand and deal with oxidized screws is practically incomparable. [Purchase: $50]

Full Windsor Nutter

Full Windsor Nutter Cycle Multi-Tool

Pro: Outstanding leverage
Con: Magnetic bits can be lost

Refined Selection: These multi-tools ordinarily have a single, defined look. They’re a pocket item with several Allen wrenches folded up into a metal frame like a tool-laden fist. Well, that is how the plebeians might carry their repair kit, but gentlemen of refined taste choose something more. The handle of the Nutter terminates in a nylon tire lever while the socket-wrench body allows you to use any of the 3-8mm hex bits or T25 torx. It also comes equipped with all the screwdrivers you could want. When not in use, it wraps beautifully in a leather under-seat saddlebag. [Purchase: $60]

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