Deep Cuts: The 7 Best Diving Knives

It is easy for human beings to forget that we cover only the tiniest portion of the surface of the Earth. We’re impressed with ourselves because we have thumbs and build skyscrapers and watch reality television shows, but we forget that the largest, wettest part of the world wouldn’t know we exist if we didn’t fill it with garbage. One of the true last frontiers on our little blue home are the oceans, and exploring them requires as much gear and preparation as going into outer space. That is something to consider the next time you choose a life-saving piece of equipment like a dive knife.

Diving knives need to check off a few criteria to be considered really quality. First, they must be capable of attaching in multiple places so that whether you need to pull from the arm, the waist, the leg, the chest, or the back, your knife will slide out without a fuss. It must be able to resist corrosion even when submerged in saltwater for extended periods. It must be capable of taking an retaining a sharp edge even after hacking through fishing line, seaweed, or the deadly embrace of any Krakens you happen upon. For blades that cover most, if not all of these bases, here’s the 7 best dive knives.

Fury Dive Knife

Fury Dive Knife

Pro: High quality and affordable
Con: Will rust faster than more expensive blades

Entry-Level: This is not an astounding overall dive knife, instead it is an astounding $30 knife that just happens to cost much less than that. If you are pinching pennies and still want to get to your favorite dive spot with a solid hunk of hardware on your hip, buy the Fury. The rubber handle allows for extended use without fatigue, though it is too soft to be an effective tank knocker. The blade is a respectable but not over nor undersized 4.5 inches of stainless steel with a standard cutting edge, a line cutter, and a serrated backside that will let you saw through anything that requires it. The sheath is plastic with a basic locking mechanism and only really works attached to your leg. A small price to pay for being allowed to pay such a small price. [Purchase: $12]

Scuba Diving Snorkeling Folding Pocket Knife

Scuba Diving Snorkeling Folding Pocket Knife

Pro: Simple folding mechanism resists corrosion
Con: Requires more maintenance

Diver’s First Folder: Folding diving knives aren’t a necessity when going into the deep, but it never hurts to have extra backup. By their nature, folding knives don’t work well with water simply because there are too many moving parts that can corrode. This budget-friendly offering comes from Promate, the fine people who make some of the best snorkel sets in the biz. Its blade is fully titanium so it won’t corrode easily. The hinge and locking mechanism are sturdy and designed with minimal moving parts to allow wetness to seep in and destroy it. It will require a little more time and energy to keep it in tip-top shape over the long haul, but as a fallback it’s excellent. [Purchase: $25]

SubGear SK75

SubGear SK75

Pro: Extremely light
Con: Small

Light and Loaded: Backpackers and hikers understand that every ounce counts when loading a pack, but they don’t know the half of it. An overloaded backpack can cause a bad day and maybe even life-long back problems. An overloaded diver can drown. The SK75 ensures that you aren’t lugging any more weight than you absolutely need. It only weighs in at a single ounce thanks to the lightweight and ultra-sharp titanium blade. It comes with a drop-point tip with smooth and serrated edges. The sheath is plastic with a locking mechanism that is fairly rudimentary, though it does include a double-thumbscrew connector that can be adjusted to fit with most standard grommets on your BC (buoyancy compensator). Can also dangle from the inflator hose. A very cherry secondary blade. [Purchase: $54]

Spyderco Atlantic Salt

Spyderco Atlantic Salt

Pro: Stern locking mechanism
Con: No line cutter

Hidden Treasure: The Salt is probably the folding knife of choice among the diving community. It is spearing marlin off the coast while its competition is still tying off bobbers to snag brook trout. Strangely enough, it breaks from the pack of modern diving knives by using H-1 steel rather than titanium for a little more heft when you’re beneath the surface. It reinforces the matrix of the metal with nitrogen that actually strengthens with use. The 3 inch, sheepfoot blade bears an eyelet that allows it to be snapped open with one hand and locks securely every time. The waffle texture on the handle gives a safe, noticeable grip that you can feel even through diving gloves. You’ll only get a serrated edge with no line cutter, so find a supplementary knife and keep this tucked away or strapped onto your BC in case of dire emergencies. Works equally well for right-handers and southpaws. [Purchase: $68]

Promate Scuba Dive Snorkel Titanium Knife

Promate Scuba Dive Snorkel Titanium Knife

Pro: Includes titanium hammer nub
Con: Handle has minimal shaping

Most for the Money: First off, there are a couple of versions of the Scuba Dive Snorkel, one with a sharp tip for digging, poking, and stabbing, and one with a safer blunt tip for less aggressive divers who aren’t anticipating any diving knife fights while they’re beneath the waves. It has a blade that comes in just under 4 and a half inches with the standard smooth blade with a serrated backing. On the bottom is a titanium nub that works as an excellent tank knocker. It is set into a smooth rubber handle that is comfortable on the hands and mostly doesn’t slip, though the ergonomics could be a little better. An array of bright colors makes this easy to see underwater for fast grabs during emergencies. [Purchase: $44]

Tusa FK-940ti X-Pert II

Tusa FK-940ti X-Pert II

Pro: Balanced handle and blade
Con: Only comes in two colors

Perfect Balance: Scuba pros, rank amateurs, and anyone who is part fish will find the money they drop on the X-Pert II dive knife to be well spent. The handle is rubber and ridged in all the right places with a counterweight built in so that it is easy to wield without straining your wrist and offers tighter control. The handle and sheath come in either an alarming red or a sleek black. The red is intense while the black can blend into the background a little too easily. Tusa offers a drop point end or a flat head complete with the standard serrations and line cutting options. The lock release is one of the easiest to find and can be hit in a natural draw motion for a quick pull. The blade is 6-4Ti titanium which shrugs off water and stands up to corrosion incredibly well, even with only minimal care. [Purchase: $90]

U.S. Divers Titanium 5-Inch

U.S. Divers Titanium 5-Inch

Pro: Easy to clean
Con: Line cutter can snag

Fine for Fighting: For a diving knife that works more like a survival knife, it was a toss up between this and the Atomic Aquatics Titanium Ti6. In the end, the lower price won the day. The drop point on this is aggressive, as is the hand grip with individualized finger scoops intended to keep the knife in place even during rigorous movement such as cutting or stabbing. The smooth blade on the front slides directly down into a line cutter which feels slightly more natural than having it on the back edge, but can also mean that the blade can get caught or stuck more easily if you jam it in up to the hilt. The sheath unlocks easily and quickly, the leg straps have simple and secure adjustments, and the entire thing can be disassembled for when you need to get the blood off of it. [Purchase: $104]

Get The Goods

HiCONSUMPTION'S DAILY NEWSLETTER

Sign up for HiConsumption The Goods

© HiConsumption | DMCA

Back To Top